My dad (not pictured here) owned and ran a small offset printing shop, Alpha Printing, for decades, and in our teen years, on occasion my older brother and I (neither in pic) would work alongside him there, learning the process from light table to dark room to printing press to the paper cutter and into the customer’s hands. Despite reducing the process to one sentence, the then pre-computerization process it seems so time consuming compared to today, but not compared with its earlier predecessor, the letterpress (not to mention hand written type proceeding Gutenberg). A while back, then Colorado College Art History major Grace Gahagan (also not pictured) took a class in CC’s Letterpress, a craft letterpress shop begun by the late art professor Jim Trissel (ditto). While I worked at the college, @colinfrazer (nope) ran the Press, and after he left CC for his Master’s, the Press was handed to Aaron Cohick, who runs it to this day, and whose mug, at last, is pictured today (appropriate filter: Inkwell). Off hours, Cohick produces his own NewLights Press limited editions from the space, including the one Grace highlights in her guest blog post, “Not So Strang” (pronounced strange), which can be found if you click the link in my profile. 
A couple more notes on Trissel: I recall getting my first introduction to the CC Letterpress back in the late ‘80’s with him when it was in the basement of Jackson House, and the gift of a card with Hippocrates’ poignant, embossed aphorism, “The life so short, the craft so long to learn.” A beautiful tribute to Trissel by his son, Ben, “A Force of Nature”, can be found by Googling “Colorado College Ben Trissel”. #newlightspressatcc #letterpress #handcrafted #printing #craft #artisan #printing #coloradocollege @ghgahagan #parentheticallyspeaking
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  • artirado1My dad (not pictured here) owned and ran a small offset printing shop, Alpha Printing, for decades, and in our teen years, on occasion my older brother and I (neither in pic) would work alongside him there, learning the process from light table to dark room to printing press to the paper cutter and into the customer’s hands. Despite reducing the process to one sentence, the then pre-computerization process it seems so time consuming compared to today, but not compared with its earlier predecessor, the letterpress (not to mention hand written type proceeding Gutenberg). A while back, then Colorado College Art History major Grace Gahagan (also not pictured) took a class in CC’s Letterpress, a craft letterpress shop begun by the late art professor Jim Trissel (ditto). While I worked at the college, @colinfrazer (nope) ran the Press, and after he left CC for his Master’s, the Press was handed to Aaron Cohick, who runs it to this day, and whose mug, at last, is pictured today (appropriate filter: Inkwell). Off hours, Cohick produces his own NewLights Press limited editions from the space, including the one Grace highlights in her guest blog post, “Not So Strang” (pronounced strange), which can be found if you click the link in my profile.
    A couple more notes on Trissel: I recall getting my first introduction to the CC Letterpress back in the late ‘80’s with him when it was in the basement of Jackson House, and the gift of a card with Hippocrates’ poignant, embossed aphorism, “The life so short, the craft so long to learn.” A beautiful tribute to Trissel by his son, Ben, “A Force of Nature”, can be found by Googling “Colorado College Ben Trissel”. #newlightspressatcc #letterpress #handcrafted #printing #craft #artisan #printing #coloradocollege @ghgahagan #parentheticallyspeaking

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