New books. Notes: 1] The Death of Ivan Ilyich is the first work by Tolstoy that I ever read, way back in the day. I still think it is one of—if not the—best short pieces of fiction that he wrote. I have not read his Confession, and in looking for an edition of it (I really don't like those Penguin Great Ideas) I came across this one, translated by the great Peter Carson, who completed his rendition of Confession and The Death of Ivan Ilych shortly before his own death (knowing that he was dying). 2] Two more Wodehouses—I'm still operating under the finish one, order the next one rule. 3] Another Kawabata to add to the collection, and to read soon. 4] I am not a fan of science fiction, as a rule, with We and 1984 and some of Vonnegut's works as exceptions. However, the story/scenario of The Man in the High Castle intrigues me, so I decided to get a copy. 5] In Very Little… Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy and Literature (such a great title), philosopher and cultural critic Simon Critchley places the question of the meaning of life back at the center of intellectual debate. Its central concern is how we can find a meaning to human finitude without recourse to anything that transcends that finitude. In a secular meditation on the theme of death, Critchley traces the idea of nihilism through Blanchot, Levinas, Jena Romanticism, and Cavell, culminating in a reading of Beckett. Sold, right? 6] After The Sound and the Fury and Absalom, Absalom! I now have another Faulkner waiting to be devoured. 7] I am becoming increasingly interested in the field of experiment philosophy (x-phi), so I decided to get these two basic works, one of which was written by students of a professor whose workshop on x-phi I followed (needless to say he recommended it). X-phi uses empirical data (experiments) to inform philosophical questions. An example of a line of research would be showing that intuitions about thought experiments vary across cultures (thereby deflating the so-called armchair arguments from based on intuition). 8] Theodore Dalrymple, pen name of Anthony Malcolm Daniels, is an English writer and retired prison doctor and psychiatrist. In the essay In Praise of Prejudice ...
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  • esarkayeNew books. Notes: 1] The Death of Ivan Ilyich is the first work by Tolstoy that I ever read, way back in the day. I still think it is one of—if not the—best short pieces of fiction that he wrote. I have not read his Confession, and in looking for an edition of it (I really don't like those Penguin Great Ideas) I came across this one, translated by the great Peter Carson, who completed his rendition of Confession and The Death of Ivan Ilych shortly before his own death (knowing that he was dying). 2] Two more Wodehouses—I'm still operating under the finish one, order the next one rule. 3] Another Kawabata to add to the collection, and to read soon. 4] I am not a fan of science fiction, as a rule, with We and 1984 and some of Vonnegut's works as exceptions. However, the story/scenario of The Man in the High Castle intrigues me, so I decided to get a copy. 5] In Very Little… Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy and Literature (such a great title), philosopher and cultural critic Simon Critchley places the question of the meaning of life back at the center of intellectual debate. Its central concern is how we can find a meaning to human finitude without recourse to anything that transcends that finitude. In a secular meditation on the theme of death, Critchley traces the idea of nihilism through Blanchot, Levinas, Jena Romanticism, and Cavell, culminating in a reading of Beckett. Sold, right? 6] After The Sound and the Fury and Absalom, Absalom! I now have another Faulkner waiting to be devoured. 7] I am becoming increasingly interested in the field of experiment philosophy (x-phi), so I decided to get these two basic works, one of which was written by students of a professor whose workshop on x-phi I followed (needless to say he recommended it). X-phi uses empirical data (experiments) to inform philosophical questions. An example of a line of research would be showing that intuitions about thought experiments vary across cultures (thereby deflating the so-called armchair arguments from based on intuition). 8] Theodore Dalrymple, pen name of Anthony Malcolm Daniels, is an English writer and retired prison doctor and psychiatrist. In the essay In Praise of Prejudice ...

  • noonlightlifeThe philosophy titles sound a bit over my head, but nonetheless...swooning over this stack. 😍
  • esarkayeTo be fair, Wittgenstein is over all of our heads. 🌩 @noonlightlife
  • dvdmxmThe Death of Ivan Ilyich is one of my favorite short stories. A Confession is good too, helped me a lot.
  • adamisforloversWhy don't you like the penguin great ideas series? I've read 3 of them now and I'm pretty happy!
  • bryan_kaufmanPhilip K. Dick is possibly my favorite writer of all time. Such a good book.
  • jimmydelastyleWhat has been your favorite Wodehouse so far? I see you were not a big fan of Code of the Wooster, but his body of work as a whole is not only humorous but very well written, as well.
  • braveliteraryworldWow wow wow great collection
  • mycatreadsmarxPhilip K Dick is very intellectual, philosophical sci fi. His VALIS is a profound meditation on perception and reality.
  • roxboxfox@esarkaye Hi Steven! Where can I buy the Tolstoy edition? Thank you! 😊
  • esarkayeI ordered it from The Book Depository! @roxboxfox
  • roxboxfox@esarkaye Great, thanks! 🤓
  • esarkayeThat does sound enticing, and again, despite his genre not being mine per se, I am looking forward to reading him! @mycatreadsmarx
  • esarkayeThank you! ☺️ @braveliteraryworld
  • esarkayeWhy would you say I'm not a big fan of The Code of the Woosters? Because of my rating/review on GR? I still gave it 4 stars, I believe, and my ratings in any case tend to reflect intra-Wodehouse comparisons. I've read 6 Jeeves & Wooster collections so far, and my favorite is still Very Good, Jeeves. I'm kind of puzzled, to be honest, why you feel you have to defend Wodehouse's writing—I've been championing him both here and on GR. So I obviously agree with you (I mean, that his stuff is humorous and that it is very well-written are the two most basic and indisputable things you can say about P.G.). @jimmydelastyle
  • esarkayeMostly because they tend not to have introductions, notes, references, et cetera. They give you the bare minimum in terms of the text in question, and sometimes they are incomplete in that they give you only the snippet of a work -as- a work in itself (an idea from Hume, from Schopenhauer, and so on). I'm very much an annotation appreciater haha, and I always want (to read) the complete works. I'm glad you like them, though! Another, perhaps less noble, reason is that there is *way* too much Penguin love here on IG, which I've never particularly shared, and which puts me off at times. So if I can get 'better' versions from different publishers, I do also enjoy giving the stage to those other publishers. @adamisforlovers
  • jimmydelastyle@esarkaye I thought you gave it a lower rating, but I noticed I credited someone's else review with yours by mistake. My question was not really a "defense" of PG but a mere commentary on the writing of Wodehouse. What I noticed with humorous writing that I have come across in the past is that it is cheap and is not well written at all., like P. J. O'Rourke's work. Wodehouse is probably the first writer that I've encountered who has an ability to elevate humorous writing to almost an art form (for instance, the well crafted conversations between Jeeves and Wooster in Code of the Woosters). I'm glad you appreciate his writing and to see his books show up on your feed. 😀
  • wingnut817Pg Wodehouse is amazing! They have the Wooster and jeeves tv show on YouTube! It's hysterical!!
  • esarkayeI want to read all of them first (I'm slowly getting there 😅) but then I'll definitely watch the show! @wingnut817
  • wingnut817@esarkaye awesome! I can't wait to hear what you think of Hugh Laurie and Stephen fry bringing them to life!
  • theboxwallaLove! I really enjoyed Thousand Cranes, and Snow Country is on my list. Which were the other Kawabatas you were referring to?
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