WHITHER THE AVE?

The fate of the Ave, the motley strip of University Way Northeast between 42nd and 50th streets, is up in the air. In February, after years of studies, community forums, and debate, the Seattle City Council voted unanimously to significantly rezone the U District, the scruffy neighborhood of which the Ave is the commercial center. However, as so often happens in municipal matters, years of downtown planning have run up against a concerted last-minute surge of resistance from those in the neighborhood who fear the changes that will follow those new zoning laws. As is, the Ave can seem frozen in time. Cheap noodle joints crowd against hookah lounges, dealers of psychic readings against dealers of esoterica. Add to this tableau college kids, street kids, drug dealers, and old men with the zonked-out look that comes after eight hours spent contemplating 17th-century philosophy, and you end up with a neighborhood that’s been called everything from “funky” to “gross,” but never “gentrified.” Indeed, the Ave lacks that most ubiquitous of Seattle icons: the proposed land-use sign that denotes the next building developers plan to demolish to make way for a new office tower or high-rise condo. 
Read Daniel Person's cover story about the Ave at seattleweekly.com.

Photo by Ted Zee @ted.zee #seattle #theave
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  • seattleweeklyWHITHER THE AVE?

    The fate of the Ave, the motley strip of University Way Northeast between 42nd and 50th streets, is up in the air. In February, after years of studies, community forums, and debate, the Seattle City Council voted unanimously to significantly rezone the U District, the scruffy neighborhood of which the Ave is the commercial center. However, as so often happens in municipal matters, years of downtown planning have run up against a concerted last-minute surge of resistance from those in the neighborhood who fear the changes that will follow those new zoning laws. As is, the Ave can seem frozen in time. Cheap noodle joints crowd against hookah lounges, dealers of psychic readings against dealers of esoterica. Add to this tableau college kids, street kids, drug dealers, and old men with the zonked-out look that comes after eight hours spent contemplating 17th-century philosophy, and you end up with a neighborhood that’s been called everything from “funky” to “gross,” but never “gentrified.” Indeed, the Ave lacks that most ubiquitous of Seattle icons: the proposed land-use sign that denotes the next building developers plan to demolish to make way for a new office tower or high-rise condo.
    Read Daniel Person's cover story about the Ave at seattleweekly.com.

    Photo by Ted Zee @ted.zee #seattle #theave

  • ttttaaaaarrrrrrgoddamn. ruling class in seattle doesn't give a shit about anyone. fucked up.
  • luckylittlefish😭
  • jvyoczgSmfh
  • rshamilton75Damn the man! Save the Ave!
  • mariafalveyCongrats @ted.zee for the cover shot and great article @seattleweekly 🏆🏆
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