Racing the Clock. Dr. Matthew Fink. Photo credit: @nyphospital 
Bonnefil is a prime example of how early intervention is critical when it comes to stroke. Neurologists often use the phrase “time is brain” when talking about the disease, since it’s well established that the sooner patients receive treatment, the better off they’re likely to be. Even short delays can make a big difference: a 2014 study by the American Heart Association found that stroke survivors lose an average month of healthy life for every 15 minutes of postponed treatment. Weill Cornell Medicine, with heavy support from @nyphospital, began leading a study of a mobile stroke treatment unit, the first of its kind on the East Coast. The unit, launched also in collaboration with @columbiamed and the @FDNY — does more than reach stroke victims quickly: it also provides a pipeline of subjects for time-sensitive clinical trials being conducted at Weill Cornell Medicine, as well as other research initiatives that may lead to new therapies. 
The unit is a customized emergency vehicle that brings a highly specialized team of experts, diagnostic equipment and stroke-specific drugs right to a patient’s doorstep. “The key to treating stroke patients is getting to them as early as you can, as fast as you can, and this unit makes that possible,” says the program’s executive director, Dr. Matthew Fink, neurologist- in-chief and chief of the Division of Stroke and Critical Care Neurology at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and the Louis and Gertrude Feil Professor and chairman of the Department of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine. “But this is just the beginning. I view this unit as something transformational that may dramatically change the way we deliver care.” “The conventional ambulance system was never designed to treat out in the field; patients aren’t seen by a doctor and don’t undergo testing until they get to the hospital,” says Dr. Fink, who first proposed the mobile program two years ago. “The mobile unit essentially becomes an extension of the emergency department.” 2/4 #stroke #MobileStrokeUnit #CareDiscoverTeach #WeillCornellMedicine
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  • weillcornellRacing the Clock. Dr. Matthew Fink. Photo credit: @nyphospital
    Bonnefil is a prime example of how early intervention is critical when it comes to stroke. Neurologists often use the phrase “time is brain” when talking about the disease, since it’s well established that the sooner patients receive treatment, the better off they’re likely to be. Even short delays can make a big difference: a 2014 study by the American Heart Association found that stroke survivors lose an average month of healthy life for every 15 minutes of postponed treatment. Weill Cornell Medicine, with heavy support from @nyphospital, began leading a study of a mobile stroke treatment unit, the first of its kind on the East Coast. The unit, launched also in collaboration with @columbiamed and the @FDNY — does more than reach stroke victims quickly: it also provides a pipeline of subjects for time-sensitive clinical trials being conducted at Weill Cornell Medicine, as well as other research initiatives that may lead to new therapies.
    The unit is a customized emergency vehicle that brings a highly specialized team of experts, diagnostic equipment and stroke-specific drugs right to a patient’s doorstep. “The key to treating stroke patients is getting to them as early as you can, as fast as you can, and this unit makes that possible,” says the program’s executive director, Dr. Matthew Fink, neurologist- in-chief and chief of the Division of Stroke and Critical Care Neurology at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and the Louis and Gertrude Feil Professor and chairman of the Department of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine. “But this is just the beginning. I view this unit as something transformational that may dramatically change the way we deliver care.” “The conventional ambulance system was never designed to treat out in the field; patients aren’t seen by a doctor and don’t undergo testing until they get to the hospital,” says Dr. Fink, who first proposed the mobile program two years ago. “The mobile unit essentially becomes an extension of the emergency department.” 2/4 #stroke #MobileStrokeUnit #CareDiscoverTeach #WeillCornellMedicine

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