Stewarding the pain and sharing more about @thecomplicatedheart on the blog. Here's a peek:
"Don't throw the ball back.”
.

Those were the words that released me. Those were the words I will never forget because they gave me something I could grasp and use to get away from verbal abuse and manipulation. .

It was my junior year of college and we had a guest lecturer for the day. The speaker was a bald man with a black mustache and a black leather jacket, and he was there because he was some kind of alcohol counselor. I sat up a little straighter in my chair that day, wanting to hear anything and everything he had to say because my mom was an alcoholic and I wanted to know how to deal with it. I don’t remember what he talked about during the class, but I do remember going up to him after and asking him if I could talk with him. We stood in the hallway and I told him my story.
.

I told him about the fact that I had a mom who was an alcoholic and who knew she was an alcoholic and had no interest in changing. I told him how it drove me crazy, how being around her or talking with her made me feel like I was crazy. We were so tangled up with each other. I told him how I always felt guilty around my mom, like somehow I always did everything wrong; I could never do things right or please her. I told him how she would call me names how she would always make me feel like I wasn’t doing enough; I felt like a total screw up. I asked him for advice. That’s when he said, “Don’t throw the ball back.” Read the rest at sarahmae.com (link in profile)
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  • sarahmaewritesStewarding the pain and sharing more about @thecomplicatedheart on the blog. Here's a peek:
    "Don't throw the ball back.”
    .

    Those were the words that released me. Those were the words I will never forget because they gave me something I could grasp and use to get away from verbal abuse and manipulation. .

    It was my junior year of college and we had a guest lecturer for the day. The speaker was a bald man with a black mustache and a black leather jacket, and he was there because he was some kind of alcohol counselor. I sat up a little straighter in my chair that day, wanting to hear anything and everything he had to say because my mom was an alcoholic and I wanted to know how to deal with it. I don’t remember what he talked about during the class, but I do remember going up to him after and asking him if I could talk with him. We stood in the hallway and I told him my story.
    .

    I told him about the fact that I had a mom who was an alcoholic and who knew she was an alcoholic and had no interest in changing. I told him how it drove me crazy, how being around her or talking with her made me feel like I was crazy. We were so tangled up with each other. I told him how I always felt guilty around my mom, like somehow I always did everything wrong; I could never do things right or please her. I told him how she would call me names how she would always make me feel like I wasn’t doing enough; I felt like a total screw up. I asked him for advice. That’s when he said, “Don’t throw the ball back.” Read the rest at sarahmae.com (link in profile)

  • christiepurifoy💗
  • at_home_with_kidsBeautiful!
  • sarahmarieguerrero💙💙💙
  • raisingjeffreysGood stuff. I can totally relate. I put up with a verbally abusive father for 28 years until I decided that was enough. Boundaries are a good thing. We can't fix them, we can only fix ourselves and heal ourselves.
  • jimwoodswritesGreat quote and awesome excerpt from your new book!!
  • nolamomma81I just love this post. I love how God uses our pain to minister to others. I was verbally and emotionally abused for most of my childhood, but God has done an amazing healing of my heart. Thank u for sharing such personal things:)
  • thehousewiferyWell, that just sums it up! 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻
  • melindaredmannThank you. Your writing draws me in. Thank you for sharing your beautiful heart. I need your book.
  • jacquelynarends"Don't throw the ball back"—that's spot on. This message is so needed. A big, big one for me was "forgiveness isn't trust." Christian culture is well intentioned but often misses the mark when ministering to emotional or verbal abuse. Boundaries are healthy, not a sign of a lack of grace or of unforgiveness.
  • trulyoliverWhich means being vulnerable. I write poetry and this really speaks to me. Thank you.
  • trulyoliverOops, I only saw the picture when I commented. Your excerpt from your book is really good. .. makes me want to read more.
  • us2wallsCan't wait to read it.
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