This photo show Eldress Sarah Collins with “the Face boys” in the Shakers’ Chair Shop. The Face family was one of many families of hired men who worked for and with the Shakers, especially in the decades following the Civil War as the ratio of male to female Shakers evolved to favor the latter and the Shakers suffered labor shortages. The story of non-Shakers at the North Family such as the Face family is just one of many illustrated by some of the historic graffiti in the Brethren’s Workshop, which includes markings and remnants left by Shakers and non-Shakers alike. Originally scheduled for this month, special graffiti tours exploring these pieces of the past will take place on April 8 at 2PM & April 22 at 3PM. Reserve your place to explore this relatively obscure part of the North Family story by registering for a tour today: http://bit.ly/2mOGXeF
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  • shakermuseumThis photo show Eldress Sarah Collins with “the Face boys” in the Shakers’ Chair Shop. The Face family was one of many families of hired men who worked for and with the Shakers, especially in the decades following the Civil War as the ratio of male to female Shakers evolved to favor the latter and the Shakers suffered labor shortages. The story of non-Shakers at the North Family such as the Face family is just one of many illustrated by some of the historic graffiti in the Brethren’s Workshop, which includes markings and remnants left by Shakers and non-Shakers alike. Originally scheduled for this month, special graffiti tours exploring these pieces of the past will take place on April 8 at 2PM & April 22 at 3PM. Reserve your place to explore this relatively obscure part of the North Family story by registering for a tour today: http://bit.ly/2mOGXeF

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