#TellUsTigers: "I'm black. My father is white from Maine. My family's black from Virginia, where the law until 1989 was if you were 1/32nd of African descent, you were black. There were laws like that across the country. I remember as a kid, driving with my grandfather in the summer from his home in Baltimore to an old black vacation community in Anne Arundel county — Highland Beach, where Frederick Douglass & Booker T. Washington had their summer homes. As we crossed the Anne Arundel county line, my grandfather, who worked in law enforcement, would slow down & just creep. It frustrated me because I wanted to get to the beach as quickly as possible. Then it made me feel very afraid, because my grandfather wasn't afraid of anything, but he was afraid of being pulled over by his fellow members of law enforcement. My family's been active in the @NAACP for 6 generations. My grandmother's grandfather was the 1st to join; he was born a slave & died a state senator & cofounder of Virginia State University. My grandmother was clear: the struggle for civil rights in our country was woefully unfinished. Having served as the 17th & youngest president of the NAACP, I'm excited about the opportunity to help shape some of our nation's youngest, best & brightest at the @WilsonSchool. These are challenging times. In moments like these, courageous leadership is especially transformative. My counsel to students who had planned to join the Clinton administration is to look for unexpected opportunities to make change from the inside: join the Federal government anyway to help stabilize a department, join law enforcement or join an activist group. I hope many will work in their state governments. State government in times like this becomes the most powerful place of refuge for groups who need protection to flourish, whether they're newly arrived refugees or people recently returned from prison seeking to turn their lives around. Ultimately, the promise of a democracy is made manifest by individual decisions made by citizens who choose to lead regardless of the climate in Washington, DC." — Ben Jealous, visiting lecturer in public & international affairs (Photo by @EganJimenez)
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  • princeton_university#TellUsTigers: "I'm black. My father is white from Maine. My family's black from Virginia, where the law until 1989 was if you were 1/32nd of African descent, you were black. There were laws like that across the country. I remember as a kid, driving with my grandfather in the summer from his home in Baltimore to an old black vacation community in Anne Arundel county — Highland Beach, where Frederick Douglass & Booker T. Washington had their summer homes. As we crossed the Anne Arundel county line, my grandfather, who worked in law enforcement, would slow down & just creep. It frustrated me because I wanted to get to the beach as quickly as possible. Then it made me feel very afraid, because my grandfather wasn't afraid of anything, but he was afraid of being pulled over by his fellow members of law enforcement. My family's been active in the @NAACP for 6 generations. My grandmother's grandfather was the 1st to join; he was born a slave & died a state senator & cofounder of Virginia State University. My grandmother was clear: the struggle for civil rights in our country was woefully unfinished. Having served as the 17th & youngest president of the NAACP, I'm excited about the opportunity to help shape some of our nation's youngest, best & brightest at the @WilsonSchool. These are challenging times. In moments like these, courageous leadership is especially transformative. My counsel to students who had planned to join the Clinton administration is to look for unexpected opportunities to make change from the inside: join the Federal government anyway to help stabilize a department, join law enforcement or join an activist group. I hope many will work in their state governments. State government in times like this becomes the most powerful place of refuge for groups who need protection to flourish, whether they're newly arrived refugees or people recently returned from prison seeking to turn their lives around. Ultimately, the promise of a democracy is made manifest by individual decisions made by citizens who choose to lead regardless of the climate in Washington, DC." — Ben Jealous, visiting lecturer in public & international affairs (Photo by @EganJimenez)

  • alexustyraLove the story! ❤
  • atdeluca🙌
  • theycallmechase@courtney_jacobs
  • mmbberlinThank you for sharing this story.
  • francispetrie@danayners
  • danayners@francispetrie are you....
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