Frederick Douglass: before his second  marriage to the woman who gets all the credit for supporting him and his work, he was married to Anna Douglass, a Black woman who got him free (literally) and spent 44 years as his dutiful wife, even and especially when he didn't deserve it.  Anna Murray-Douglass. "By the late 1840s Anna lost much of her emotional support system. Her daughter, Rosetta, was away at school in Albany, New York; and her friend and household helper, Harriet Bailey, had married and moved to Springfield, Massachusetts. Meanwhile, her husband toured England, where rumors spread about the attention lavished on him by the English ladies. After his return in 1847 Douglass moved the family to Rochester, New York, taking Anna away from the small but active black community of which she had been a part in Lynn. 
Shortly thereafter she suffered the indignity of having the British reformer Julia Griffiths move into the Douglass home, which caused a storm of controversy alleging Frederick’s infidelity with Griffiths. The departure of Griffiths was followed by the arrival of Ottilie Assing, who installed herself in the Douglass home for several months out of the year over the next twenty years. 
For much of her life Anna lived isolated from supportive African American companionship while hosting a string of white abolitionists who could barely conceal their disdain for her. Only the extended stays of Rosetta and her children and the companionship of Louisa Sprague, Rosetta’s sister-in-law who lived in the Douglass home as a housekeeper, relieved Anna’s loneliness. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2007/02/black_history_m3/#sthash.Zbok7bPL.dpuf
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  • accradotaltradioFrederick Douglass: before his second marriage to the woman who gets all the credit for supporting him and his work, he was married to Anna Douglass, a Black woman who got him free (literally) and spent 44 years as his dutiful wife, even and especially when he didn't deserve it. Anna Murray-Douglass. "By the late 1840s Anna lost much of her emotional support system. Her daughter, Rosetta, was away at school in Albany, New York; and her friend and household helper, Harriet Bailey, had married and moved to Springfield, Massachusetts. Meanwhile, her husband toured England, where rumors spread about the attention lavished on him by the English ladies. After his return in 1847 Douglass moved the family to Rochester, New York, taking Anna away from the small but active black community of which she had been a part in Lynn.
    Shortly thereafter she suffered the indignity of having the British reformer Julia Griffiths move into the Douglass home, which caused a storm of controversy alleging Frederick’s infidelity with Griffiths. The departure of Griffiths was followed by the arrival of Ottilie Assing, who installed herself in the Douglass home for several months out of the year over the next twenty years.
    For much of her life Anna lived isolated from supportive African American companionship while hosting a string of white abolitionists who could barely conceal their disdain for her. Only the extended stays of Rosetta and her children and the companionship of Louisa Sprague, Rosetta’s sister-in-law who lived in the Douglass home as a housekeeper, relieved Anna’s loneliness. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2007/02/black_history_m3/#sthash.Zbok7bPL.dpuf

  • mantse_ghDeep
  • jacquelineosaWow
  • mbaleeekhanyeeeThis was tough to read.
  • teneeattohWoW
  • globalfusionist😳- very interesting thought provoking read.
  • stillsherisesThese dudes!!! Half-revolutionaries. No one is free until women are free
  • nubianfxHmmm.. #themoreyouknow
  • efuagramYasss! Our bones bend to stay strong! These women who have housed these revolutionaries fanciful dances of ego! How we endure both inspires and deflates me.
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