Haldi Dhoodh has been a staple before bed time for the last week or so. @omairsattar says it has magical properties. It soothes instantly. It is part and parcel of my Pakistani heritage. Although I readily admit to tweaking it with a few drops of orange blossom water. I am somewhat amazed by its popularity as one can now get turmeric lattes at all manner of clean eating cafes and even buy it in powdered form. I could not quite articulate what it was about the new craze that struck me as somewhat disingenuous. Then I read @taraobrady's piece 'Same drink, different table: The so-called discovery of haldi doodh in the West' in @globeandmail. She hit the nail on the head when she says "The current breathless reverence of the turmeric trend ignores a simple, but important, banality: We've been doing this for generations, above and beyond fashion and not linked to some ephemeral mysticism. This so-called discovery is a framing that excludes the persevering vitality of the culture, one that is the thriving chronicle of its past and still relevant to its present."
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  • comeconellaHaldi Dhoodh has been a staple before bed time for the last week or so. @omairsattar says it has magical properties. It soothes instantly. It is part and parcel of my Pakistani heritage. Although I readily admit to tweaking it with a few drops of orange blossom water. I am somewhat amazed by its popularity as one can now get turmeric lattes at all manner of clean eating cafes and even buy it in powdered form. I could not quite articulate what it was about the new craze that struck me as somewhat disingenuous. Then I read @taraobrady's piece 'Same drink, different table: The so-called discovery of haldi doodh in the West' in @globeandmail. She hit the nail on the head when she says "The current breathless reverence of the turmeric trend ignores a simple, but important, banality: We've been doing this for generations, above and beyond fashion and not linked to some ephemeral mysticism. This so-called discovery is a framing that excludes the persevering vitality of the culture, one that is the thriving chronicle of its past and still relevant to its present."

  • comeconella#comeconella #eeeeeats #forkyeah #f52grams #feedfeed #huffposttaste #foodvsco #eattheworld #exploretocreate #onthetable #communitythroughfood #thatsdarling #foodstories #littlestoriesofmylife #guardianfood #saveur #culturetripfood #tastingtable #food52
  • alikhurshid1How does it taste? Is it not a Karachi thing? How come I've never had it? Why doesn't my family make it? Are we losers?
  • saharahmed88It really is a miracle healer. I am unbelievably prone to bone and muscle injuries which linger and take forever to heal, only to act up again. Nothing ever works. But I finally gave in to my mothers incessant lectures to use this totka last year and I now hurt myself less than before and when I do, I heal much much faster. Magic!
  • antitranceI need to read that article! I'm south Indian and my mum has made this for me for my whole life (and I certainly didn't enjoy it when I was younger) and I found its recent appearance in trendy places really puzzling. I haven't had it in ages because it tended to be more of a special drink made when I was on the verge of getting ill but your addition of orange blossom water makes it sound mouthwatering.
  • unum.aCoconut oil is also one of these "miracle discoveries".
  • comeconella@alikhurshid1 I did not care for it much as a child. My paternal family used it for coughs and colds. Haldi is anti inflammatory. The milk is boiled with cinnamon and cloves and cardamom to which haldi is added. My family is Punjabi so I cannot say for Karachi. Perhaps the more temperate weather means you have different 'desi nuskhas'.
  • comeconella@saharahmed88 I can believe you on that. I am prone to soft tissue injuries myself. Mama has recently told me about calcium from egg shells that is excellent for bones. Totkas have a lot of logic to them. x
  • comeconella@antitrance you can find my recipe here https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/jul/23/turmeric-recipes-chocolate-mousse-hummus-saag-. Do read Tara's article. It references some of the other ones that have appeared over the year. I would love to hear your thoughts.
  • comeconella@unum.a yes. That too.
  • antitrance@comeconella Lovely, thanks for sharing - I shall give it a go when I return home in a couple of days. My sister told me she'd recently started adding a hint of freshly cracked black pepper and a drop of honey when she made it, which also sounds delicious.
  • honeywhatscooking
  • jesse.dartThere was a great piece in the NYtimes by Tejal Rao- such a nice piece and recipe. Val and I keep a mix called a honey bomb in the fridge ready for hot water: honey, turmeric, ginger and black pepper. Saved us many times here in London.
  • comeconella@jesse.dart I have that on my list of things to read. A lot of people have mentioned it. That sounds like a lovely combination.
  • comeconella@antitrance yes. It does. And incidentally black pepper helps activate turmeric. That is why one uses it or a fatty element so that it can work its charm.
  • antitrance@comeconella Ah interesting, you learn something new every day!
  • comeconella@antitrance by the way, you take beautiful photographs.
  • antitrance@comeconella thank you so much!
  • cookshalaWow like it!
  • sweettooth_centralThat's wild👌🏽
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