Still on my grind! Turning acorn 🌰 into flour. Yesterday I released a podcast episode about movies, documentaries, and shows I like to watch while I crack and pick acorns. The next step is grinding them into flour like you see above ~ I'm using a Quaker City grain mill in this pic ~ before leeching them in changes of cold water for about a week (to remove their tannic acids, rendering them edible). It's a lot more work than buying store bought flour, but it's more fun, nutritionally rewarding, and personally satisfying. I see people returning to acorns (as a staple food) to be one of the most sustainable acts of defiance against the domestication and globalization of our diets. The above might sound like a joke or over simplification, but the ramifications are actually tremendous. Learning to forage some trail nibbles or herbal medicines is wonderful, but foraging a staple food really moves the needle when it comes to reducing our dependence on unethical and nutritionally unsound food systems.  Adding some hunting and fishing to acorn foraging allows a person to acquire a significant amount of their annual calories from wild, local food sheds. What's more, acorn is easy to identify, abundantly available to many people around the world, offers a complete protein profile, and can be cooked into delicious recipes. What's not to love?
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  • danielvitalisStill on my grind! Turning acorn 🌰 into flour. Yesterday I released a podcast episode about movies, documentaries, and shows I like to watch while I crack and pick acorns. The next step is grinding them into flour like you see above ~ I'm using a Quaker City grain mill in this pic ~ before leeching them in changes of cold water for about a week (to remove their tannic acids, rendering them edible). It's a lot more work than buying store bought flour, but it's more fun, nutritionally rewarding, and personally satisfying. I see people returning to acorns (as a staple food) to be one of the most sustainable acts of defiance against the domestication and globalization of our diets. The above might sound like a joke or over simplification, but the ramifications are actually tremendous. Learning to forage some trail nibbles or herbal medicines is wonderful, but foraging a staple food really moves the needle when it comes to reducing our dependence on unethical and nutritionally unsound food systems. Adding some hunting and fishing to acorn foraging allows a person to acquire a significant amount of their annual calories from wild, local food sheds. What's more, acorn is easy to identify, abundantly available to many people around the world, offers a complete protein profile, and can be cooked into delicious recipes. What's not to love?

  • breez_kitchen@danielvitalis thanks very much. I'll definitely reach out to him 🙏🏻
  • doeadeer1111AMazing . Never knew this til now . Thanks x
  • organicandwildRiver cottage was one of the things I watched that catapulted me into gathering food for myself and I was hoping you'd include it in your list! I have watched and loved several of the things you listed- right on!
  • lealanderAnyone know a staple carb type food in New Zealand? We have oak trees but they are an introduced species and the first people's (Maori) brought kumera (sweet potato) with them as a staple crop to grow. Other than that information I find says there are native carb sources but they are not the kinds of things you could gather in large quantities.
  • nikkigondaCan you buy acorn flour anywhere! This is so awesome :) acorn pancakes mmm
  • lisaghz@danielvitalis hope you share a recipe of the cookies sometime!
  • micboehm77I just came back from a place where the rocks had the bowl to grind acorns carved out. The local natives here where I live used acorn as their main winter staple. All over our valley you can find the acorn rock bowls under oak trees...
  • danielvitalis@nikkigonda I've seen one person selling online. You should be able to search engine that pretty easy 🙏🏾
  • danielvitalis@micboehm77 hey you! Amazing, I'd like to see that. It's a reminder of how recent that part of N American "history" is. Stone mortars are more beautiful and sustainable than this contraption I'm using! 👆🏽🙄
  • rdtacWhere can I buy one of those?
  • micboehm77@danielvitalis I'll take a pic tomorrow
  • roosshamananaHave you read the continuum concept? Reading now. Right up your alley.
  • jadenjaymes@danielvitalis thanks will probably order some! And the venison is AMAZING!! haven't made the strap back yet..hope to have time this week! 🦌😋
  • lycheetherapeuticsWould love any recipes you are willing to share;) I've been experimenting, both successfully and not, but am always grateful for any tips/tricks of the trade.
  • saltsandwest
  • healthylivingco_Love this!
  • jessfreedomzineF*yeah, I want to move the needle. Thanks for the inspiration.
  • jessfreedomzine@wantaforge Yes!!
  • reycaparrosphotoandvideoThanks Daniel!! We have a few oak trees in out yard and has been wondering if we can eat them.
  • wyatt2015@danielvitalis Think you'll ever have a cat? They're very 'MovNat', hygienic, self sufficient and unlike domesticated canine, they resemble their wild progenitors in every way except size. Plus they're total stoners... catnip.
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