Name: Clyde Komp || “I pastored at a Nazarene church in Spokane for over twenty years. After a while, I realized that I disliked being behind the pulpit, because the stuff I was preaching on wasn’t usually an honest reflection of where my own faith was at. I had a lot of questions and things that I wrestled with intensely. For instance, this idea that God is not transcendent; God is here always, you know… it’s really kind of hard in a fleshly presence to equate to something that doesn’t appear in some sense—like something spiritual. We were taught that Jesus lives in you, but what does that actually mean? I mean, who’s in there? And trying to explain that as a pastor to people who really have honest questions is such a challenge. The minute you deviate from what the doctrinal teachings of the church are when you try to explain it, you’re going to get pressure from both sides; the people who want answers and the people who want you to give them their answers. Then you find yourself standing in-between the two thinking, ‘I really don’t know.’ Even now when I find myself talking to people about the question, ‘what is it you believe,’ I don’t think I have that nailed down, and I don’t think I ever will. 
Last Sunday, I was talking to a fellow after the service, and he looked at me and said ‘I keep looking for a God that I can believe in, and I can’t find it.’ And then asked me, ‘how about you?’ And I said, ‘All I can tell you is that I sense something that is good, and that is internal. And I think it’s something other than me and my mind that’s there, but it’s not something I can fully comprehend.’ Honestly, I think the best definition that I can come up with for God is ‘to breathe.’” #humansofbranches #wearebranches
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  • we_are_branchesName: Clyde Komp || “I pastored at a Nazarene church in Spokane for over twenty years. After a while, I realized that I disliked being behind the pulpit, because the stuff I was preaching on wasn’t usually an honest reflection of where my own faith was at. I had a lot of questions and things that I wrestled with intensely. For instance, this idea that God is not transcendent; God is here always, you know… it’s really kind of hard in a fleshly presence to equate to something that doesn’t appear in some sense—like something spiritual. We were taught that Jesus lives in you, but what does that actually mean? I mean, who’s in there? And trying to explain that as a pastor to people who really have honest questions is such a challenge. The minute you deviate from what the doctrinal teachings of the church are when you try to explain it, you’re going to get pressure from both sides; the people who want answers and the people who want you to give them their answers. Then you find yourself standing in-between the two thinking, ‘I really don’t know.’ Even now when I find myself talking to people about the question, ‘what is it you believe,’ I don’t think I have that nailed down, and I don’t think I ever will.
    Last Sunday, I was talking to a fellow after the service, and he looked at me and said ‘I keep looking for a God that I can believe in, and I can’t find it.’ And then asked me, ‘how about you?’ And I said, ‘All I can tell you is that I sense something that is good, and that is internal. And I think it’s something other than me and my mind that’s there, but it’s not something I can fully comprehend.’ Honestly, I think the best definition that I can come up with for God is ‘to breathe.’” #humansofbranches #wearebranches

  • nathanjay85Hmm something about this guy seems familiar ... #faja
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