1,715 likes
  • realsteamboat@danny.brainard by the number, type, and location of cones (as in rods and cones) in their eyes. This only determines what colors the animal is *able* to detect, it is up to their brain to figure out which colors are *actually* seen. So really we only know what colors they could be able to see, but perhaps not what they actually see. Animals that have rods but no cones see in black and white. 😊
  • hakobah@realsteamboat back and white are colors.
  • momma2peas@magic_legs_
  • realsteamboat@hakobah black is technically the absence of color, defined in regard to how sight is dependent on the reflection of light. White is all of the colors in the visual spectrum "mixed". If you want to get really technical, animals with only rods and no cones see do not see in "black and white", they see in *grayscale*. Black and white is simply a layman's term. Might want to use a science book as your reference instead of a box of crayons. πŸΈβ˜• if you've got any further arguments, you are free to take them up with the scientific community, or Oxford University I suppose.
  • realsteamboat@hakobah visible light is simply a part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Colors are specific wavelengths of that visible light. Black and white are not technically colors because they have *no specific wavelength*. Savvy?
  • bgrahamj@mallorymullane
  • caitycakes27@hash_tak hmmm
  • mpholcombeColorblind people see colors too
  • chefdan1982@cookingbarbie
  • jweeve@thisisnotregan wonderful news!
  • hakobah@realsteamboat If you want to go that route white light is actually the combination of all light in the visible spectrum so if you can see white you can see colors.
  • realsteamboat@hakobah yes, that's what I said πŸ˜• but you are confusing additive and subtractive color mixing. Honestly this is just a case of the Dunning Kruger effect on your part, unfortunately.
  • realsteamboat@ hakobah some animals see wavelengths outside of the visible color spectrum which is likely what you're confusing with "if you can see light you can see color". The problem here is that your personal definition of "light" is oversimplified. Hence the #dunningkrugereffect
  • hakobah@realsteamboat Wow, talk about the Dunning Kruger effect and delicate egos. I apologize for riling your's up.
  • realsteamboat^lol okay πŸ˜‚
  • melameloco@moanajan
  • cffronAlvin can see more colors than scientists previously knew possible.
  • laurenelizabeth802@m4s1g1
  • andrewbulger@erlowry !!!
  • erlowry@andrewbulger !!!!
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