Stole this picture from @korey.vanwyk
This is picture is a great illustration of how there are different phases of sprinting. Often top speed is thought of as the holy grail in sports, but that concept is a little misleading. Most sports don't achieve top speeds and when you do achieve top speed in a sport it means you have already made or you gave up a big play. For example, a great running back isn't someone who can out run you after 40 yards. A great running back is someone who can out run you in the first 3 yards. .⚫️ The graph shows how large of a role maximal force plays in the first part of the acceleration phase. This is sort of true. Yes there is no doubt that max force is important, but it's also max force within a given time frame (RFD). This is why you see players like Russell Westbrook blow by people off the first step. It isn't because he can squat 500lbs (He probably can't come close to that). It is because he can develop a high rate of force in a short period of time. The first phase shouldn't be labeled "maximal force" I would argue it should be labeled something along the lines of "force dependent". Because this phase is much more dependent on concentric force production, but not necessarily maximal concentric force production, while the other phases have greater contributions from elasticity. If strength was the only determining factor in acceleration basketball players would have the worst first step.

#trackandfield #strengthtraining #sportsscience #exercisescience #lift #lifting #strength #strengthtraining #strengthandconditioning #strengthcoach #powerlifting #weightlifting #weights #crossfit #olympiclifting #runfaster #strong #stronger
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  • strong_by_scienceStole this picture from @korey.vanwyk
    This is picture is a great illustration of how there are different phases of sprinting. Often top speed is thought of as the holy grail in sports, but that concept is a little misleading. Most sports don't achieve top speeds and when you do achieve top speed in a sport it means you have already made or you gave up a big play. For example, a great running back isn't someone who can out run you after 40 yards. A great running back is someone who can out run you in the first 3 yards. .⚫️ The graph shows how large of a role maximal force plays in the first part of the acceleration phase. This is sort of true. Yes there is no doubt that max force is important, but it's also max force within a given time frame (RFD). This is why you see players like Russell Westbrook blow by people off the first step. It isn't because he can squat 500lbs (He probably can't come close to that). It is because he can develop a high rate of force in a short period of time. The first phase shouldn't be labeled "maximal force" I would argue it should be labeled something along the lines of "force dependent". Because this phase is much more dependent on concentric force production, but not necessarily maximal concentric force production, while the other phases have greater contributions from elasticity. If strength was the only determining factor in acceleration basketball players would have the worst first step.

    #trackandfield #strengthtraining #sportsscience #exercisescience #lift #lifting #strength #strengthtraining #strengthandconditioning #strengthcoach #powerlifting #weightlifting #weights #crossfit #olympiclifting #runfaster #strong #stronger

  • gunzz_camm🙄👆🏽🙌
  • fit_onion_Great post!!!
  • coach_flashReactionary force development - reflexive strength 🤔
  • viniciuspowerlifterJust read an article (I belive from @chrisabeardsley) which point out that training with heavy weights had the most impact in RFD than other methods. I don't think a 500lb squat is a big deal for a top NFL player. Keep up the good work!
  • strong_by_science@coach_flash something like that. Frans Bosch refers to it as muscle slack and how fast you can pretense the muscle before a movement
  • strong_by_science@coach_flash the issue with lifting weights is that you are developing all concentric load with an already pre-tended eccentric load. In sports athletes don't get an external eccentric load to pre-tense muscles. They just have to go
  • strong_by_science@viniciuspowerlifter true, I agree. But there are many different types of RFD (initial and maximal). It's like why can Floyd Mayweather throw a punch faster than a 500 pound bencher? The bencher probably has a high maximal rfd, but a low initial rfd.
  • strong_by_science@viniciuspowerlifter also looking a football players is a little misleading, because they need strength for many more reasons than just performance. Being a collision sport they need size to absorb force. Size tends to go hand in hand with strength
  • ericbenedick@strong_by_science what is then in your opinion the best way to develop an athletes RFD, specifically for a basketball player ?
  • viniciuspowerlifterThe research I mentioned https://www.instagram.com/p/BN3lTIyDult/
  • strong_by_science@viniciuspowerlifter message me that. I can't copy it otherwise. Thanks 👍👍
  • train_gain_retain@rflo_2
  • patrick_colmeneroBest way to develop RFD is programming in jumps and power movements such as a clean correctly. Cleans along with correct jumps (focusing on hip displacement not feet displacement) with accommodative resistance such as even a single strand mini band or doubled up micro is the best way to teach acceleration- both safe deceleration as well as acceleration in some cases with over-speed eccentrics. Problem is that people do 50 cleans in a row AMRAP style, rather than training at a % that equates to either the work the athlete will have to do or an energy system they commonly use in sport. RFD in terms of Louie Simmons would be that 60%-65% 1rm range with 40% of that 65% coming from the band tension. A 300lb be bencher only needs about 70lbs top weight (chain or band) of accommodative resistance and the rest should be bar weight for true speed strength and RFD work.
  • ethan_turpen25@hunter_saffell🏃🏽💨 I think we do just fine with all of our speed lessons! Right on the money!
  • hunter_saffell@ethan_turpen25 that's great stuff. Yes, I think we are!
  • strong_by_science@patrick_colmenero a concept you might want to look into is the ballistic nature of muscle action versus the tonic nature. It is an interesting concept that very few books talk about. It kind of got lost in the fray back in the 70s/80s. Personally I think it explains a lot of the RFD misconceptions we have today
  • patrick_colmeneroI'll absolutely look into that thanks for the feedback
  • fitness_expert24I love this... Can we plz have more sport stuff like this.. @strong_by_science
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