Rebranding deplorability. One of the basic functions of branding is the control and systemization of language, regulating what can be said, and how it can be said, in order to effectively perpetuate the mission of an enterprise. Implicit in that act is the notion that language is fundamentally ideological and that in communication with a public the specificity of words matter. Fringe movements have traditionally rejected this political word-smithing, and  endless language-tweaking to achieve particular effects with predetermined audiences, as the basis for so-called political correctness, opting instead for vulgar “straight-talk” passed off as an index of authenticity. Thus the threads of 4chan.org are stocked with full-blown racist, misogynistic, homophobic and generally crude bleating celebrated as free speech liberated from PC-bondage. Its curious then to find that one of the fringiest of movements – White Supremacy – engaging in the kind of linguistic-sanitization its hard-core adherents would deride were they to turn up in the Oberlin Review. Supremacy is recast as White Nationalism, then “White Racial Consciousness.” In 2010, Richard Spencer, president of the National Policy Institute, a non-profit “dedicated to the heritage, identity, and future of people of European descent in the United States,” coined the title Alternative-Right, later shortened to the now ubiquitous Alt-Right. (The curious adoption of Pepe the cartoon frog-meme as mascot will be dealt with at a later date.) Recently Spencer relabeled his particular brand of racial hatred as “identitarianism,” a term that mimics the language of the identity politics the movement deplores. In response to this deliberate masking, an anonymous activist, working under the pseudonym George Zola, has created “Stop Normalizing the Alt-Right,” a Google Chrome extension that automatically replaces “alt-right” with the more accurate “white supremacy,” a reminder that un-branding can be a form of resistance too.  #branding #brandlanguage #altright #design
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  • microcritiqueRebranding deplorability. One of the basic functions of branding is the control and systemization of language, regulating what can be said, and how it can be said, in order to effectively perpetuate the mission of an enterprise. Implicit in that act is the notion that language is fundamentally ideological and that in communication with a public the specificity of words matter. Fringe movements have traditionally rejected this political word-smithing, and endless language-tweaking to achieve particular effects with predetermined audiences, as the basis for so-called political correctness, opting instead for vulgar “straight-talk” passed off as an index of authenticity. Thus the threads of 4chan.org are stocked with full-blown racist, misogynistic, homophobic and generally crude bleating celebrated as free speech liberated from PC-bondage. Its curious then to find that one of the fringiest of movements – White Supremacy – engaging in the kind of linguistic-sanitization its hard-core adherents would deride were they to turn up in the Oberlin Review. Supremacy is recast as White Nationalism, then “White Racial Consciousness.” In 2010, Richard Spencer, president of the National Policy Institute, a non-profit “dedicated to the heritage, identity, and future of people of European descent in the United States,” coined the title Alternative-Right, later shortened to the now ubiquitous Alt-Right. (The curious adoption of Pepe the cartoon frog-meme as mascot will be dealt with at a later date.) Recently Spencer relabeled his particular brand of racial hatred as “identitarianism,” a term that mimics the language of the identity politics the movement deplores. In response to this deliberate masking, an anonymous activist, working under the pseudonym George Zola, has created “Stop Normalizing the Alt-Right,” a Google Chrome extension that automatically replaces “alt-right” with the more accurate “white supremacy,” a reminder that un-branding can be a form of resistance too. #branding #brandlanguage #altright #design

  • mrweaferI still don't like vellum
  • studiocatblBravo as always ! BL
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