Trying to get your #Supermoon shot? Use the hashtag #MyMoonshot when you upload your pictures on social media, and your best picture could win you exclusive #TeamIndus merchandise.

Here a few tips from NASA senior photographer Bill Ingalls: "Don’t make the mistake of photographing the moon by itself with no reference to anything. Think of how to make the image creative—that means tying it into some land-based object. It can be a local landmark or anything to give your photo a sense of place.” To get the right light balance of the moon on newer iPhones and other smartphones, “Tap the screen and hold your finger on the object (in this case, the moon) to lock the focus. Then slide your finger up or down to darken or lighten the exposure.” For digital SLR photography, Ingalls uses the daylight white balance setting for capturing moonlight, since sunlight is being reflected. For those with longer lenses he advises, “Keep in mind that the moon is a moving object. It’s a balancing act between trying to get the right exposure and realizing that the shutter speed typically needs to be a lot faster.”
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  • teamindusTrying to get your #Supermoon shot? Use the hashtag #MyMoonshot when you upload your pictures on social media, and your best picture could win you exclusive #TeamIndus merchandise.

    Here a few tips from NASA senior photographer Bill Ingalls: "Don’t make the mistake of photographing the moon by itself with no reference to anything. Think of how to make the image creative—that means tying it into some land-based object. It can be a local landmark or anything to give your photo a sense of place.” To get the right light balance of the moon on newer iPhones and other smartphones, “Tap the screen and hold your finger on the object (in this case, the moon) to lock the focus. Then slide your finger up or down to darken or lighten the exposure.” For digital SLR photography, Ingalls uses the daylight white balance setting for capturing moonlight, since sunlight is being reflected. For those with longer lenses he advises, “Keep in mind that the moon is a moving object. It’s a balancing act between trying to get the right exposure and realizing that the shutter speed typically needs to be a lot faster.”

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