REVIEW ** I didn’t have a good reading month in October. It was the start of a new school year and I was overwhelmed by new impressions, required reading and weekly tasks. In other words, there was hardly any time left to read. I also suffered from a giant reading slump and this book is in part responsible.

The Martian is Andy Weirs debut novel. His parents were both scientists and he inherited their passion for science. When he was fifteen years old, he started working for an American national laboratory. He then continued his career as a computer programmer. He manages to combine his interest for science, especially for outer space, in his first novel, The Martian. This book is a huge success and has now been made into a movie with Matt Damon in the role of the main character Mark Watney.

The Martian tells the story of astronaut Mark Watney who has been left behind on the planet Mars. Both the crew of his mission and the Earth think Whatney  is death, but then he turns up to be alive. What follows is a struggle to survive until the next mission can pick him up. Everything goes wrong ... Will Watney ever return to Earth?

Although the story itself is a great idea (space, astronaut stranded on a planet ...), I’m pretty disappointed. The biggest problem is Weirs scientific background. He constantly feels the need to interrupt the narrative character with mathematical and scientific calculations. Maybe he wants to teach the reader something or he wants to show them what he knows, but these calculations are (in my opinion) more than half of the book. Since I'm not a scientist myself (or have any interest in it), this is a huge letdown.
The main character, Mark Watney, has a good sense of humor. Unfortunately his jokes are saved up until the end of a chapter. More Watney and fewer calculations would have been better.
There are several perspectives in the book: Watney, the crew of the spacecraft and the Earth. It is mainly in the passages of Watney that the calculations are very present. Maybe I therefore prefer the chapters of the Earth and the crew. In these chapters there is more interaction and dynamic. The inner monologues of Watney sadly didn't appeal to me.
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  • actafabulaest.blogREVIEW ** I didn’t have a good reading month in October. It was the start of a new school year and I was overwhelmed by new impressions, required reading and weekly tasks. In other words, there was hardly any time left to read. I also suffered from a giant reading slump and this book is in part responsible.

    The Martian is Andy Weirs debut novel. His parents were both scientists and he inherited their passion for science. When he was fifteen years old, he started working for an American national laboratory. He then continued his career as a computer programmer. He manages to combine his interest for science, especially for outer space, in his first novel, The Martian. This book is a huge success and has now been made into a movie with Matt Damon in the role of the main character Mark Watney.

    The Martian tells the story of astronaut Mark Watney who has been left behind on the planet Mars. Both the crew of his mission and the Earth think Whatney is death, but then he turns up to be alive. What follows is a struggle to survive until the next mission can pick him up. Everything goes wrong ... Will Watney ever return to Earth?

    Although the story itself is a great idea (space, astronaut stranded on a planet ...), I’m pretty disappointed. The biggest problem is Weirs scientific background. He constantly feels the need to interrupt the narrative character with mathematical and scientific calculations. Maybe he wants to teach the reader something or he wants to show them what he knows, but these calculations are (in my opinion) more than half of the book. Since I'm not a scientist myself (or have any interest in it), this is a huge letdown.
    The main character, Mark Watney, has a good sense of humor. Unfortunately his jokes are saved up until the end of a chapter. More Watney and fewer calculations would have been better.
    There are several perspectives in the book: Watney, the crew of the spacecraft and the Earth. It is mainly in the passages of Watney that the calculations are very present. Maybe I therefore prefer the chapters of the Earth and the crew. In these chapters there is more interaction and dynamic. The inner monologues of Watney sadly didn't appeal to me.

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