September 22 saw TLC staff members Torrey and Andrew visit the Caromar Covenant, located near Duncan. The Caromar Covenant will one day be a park in the Cowichan Valley Regional District but for now remains relatively undisturbed, bordered by housing development on only one side.

The 27 hectare (68 acres) parcel is home to many different species, including the Western toad, a species listed as special concern under SARA (Species At Risk Act). During monitoring, Torrey and Andrew bumped into two people who were tracking a Western toad, toad #39 as they called it, using radio telemetry to determine how far and where the toads travel after leaving their breeding pond.  While no toads were observed during this years’ monitoring visit, there was at least one toad seen last year. Hopefully toad #39 was found eventually!

After walking the northern boundary of the covenant to ensure no infractions had taken place where development was occurring, Torrey and Andrew bushwhacked along deer trails from the northwest corner of the covenant to the southwest – this was no small feat as the topography changes included a steep cliff and only deer trails exist within the covenant. The hard work paid off when they found the southwest corner pin and a seasonal pond adjacent to the southern covenant boundary. This pond may be used by the Western toads as a source of moisture, and it was evident that deer used it as well as prints in the mud were everywhere.

Find out more at http://conservancy.bc.ca/2016/10/caromar-covenant-monitoring-in-the-cowichan-valley-regional-district/
  • tlc4bcSeptember 22 saw TLC staff members Torrey and Andrew visit the Caromar Covenant, located near Duncan. The Caromar Covenant will one day be a park in the Cowichan Valley Regional District but for now remains relatively undisturbed, bordered by housing development on only one side.

    The 27 hectare (68 acres) parcel is home to many different species, including the Western toad, a species listed as special concern under SARA (Species At Risk Act). During monitoring, Torrey and Andrew bumped into two people who were tracking a Western toad, toad #39 as they called it, using radio telemetry to determine how far and where the toads travel after leaving their breeding pond. While no toads were observed during this years’ monitoring visit, there was at least one toad seen last year. Hopefully toad #39 was found eventually!

    After walking the northern boundary of the covenant to ensure no infractions had taken place where development was occurring, Torrey and Andrew bushwhacked along deer trails from the northwest corner of the covenant to the southwest – this was no small feat as the topography changes included a steep cliff and only deer trails exist within the covenant. The hard work paid off when they found the southwest corner pin and a seasonal pond adjacent to the southern covenant boundary. This pond may be used by the Western toads as a source of moisture, and it was evident that deer used it as well as prints in the mud were everywhere.

    Find out more at http://conservancy.bc.ca/2016/10/caromar-covenant-monitoring-in-the-cowichan-valley-regional-district/

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