To celebrate 50 years of the National Historic Preservation Act, this is Hill Country History's submission in the Underrepresented Places category of the #p50photo Photography Contest.  This is Carnegie Auditorium, part of the Mississippi Industrial College in Holly Springs, Mississippi.  Mississippi Industrial College was a historically black college founded in 1905 by the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church under the leadership of Elias Cottrell, a former slave who eventually rose to become the Bishop of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church.  At its height, Mississippi Industrial College had over 500 students, and educated several generations of African-Americans.  The end of state-sponsored segregation resulted in the decline of the school, and M.I.C. closed in 1982.  The buildings have been in serious decline for over 30 years.  Rust College, another black college located across the street, has owned the buildings since 2008, and is attempting to preserve the remaining buildings.  Carnegie Auditorium was built in 1923 in the Colonial Revival style, using funds from the Andrew Carnegie foundation.  For many years it was the largest single structure built by and for African-Americans in the State of Mississippi.  Carnegie Auditorium was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.  #hillcountryhistory #hollysprings #mississippi #hollyspringsms #mississippiindustrialcollege #carnegie #carnegiefoundation #africanamerican #africanamericanhistory #nationalregisterofhistoricplaces #hbcu #underrepresented
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  • hillcountryhistoryTo celebrate 50 years of the National Historic Preservation Act, this is Hill Country History's submission in the Underrepresented Places category of the #p50photo Photography Contest. This is Carnegie Auditorium, part of the Mississippi Industrial College in Holly Springs, Mississippi. Mississippi Industrial College was a historically black college founded in 1905 by the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church under the leadership of Elias Cottrell, a former slave who eventually rose to become the Bishop of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church. At its height, Mississippi Industrial College had over 500 students, and educated several generations of African-Americans. The end of state-sponsored segregation resulted in the decline of the school, and M.I.C. closed in 1982. The buildings have been in serious decline for over 30 years. Rust College, another black college located across the street, has owned the buildings since 2008, and is attempting to preserve the remaining buildings. Carnegie Auditorium was built in 1923 in the Colonial Revival style, using funds from the Andrew Carnegie foundation. For many years it was the largest single structure built by and for African-Americans in the State of Mississippi. Carnegie Auditorium was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. #hillcountryhistory #hollysprings #mississippi #hollyspringsms #mississippiindustrialcollege #carnegie #carnegiefoundation #africanamerican #africanamericanhistory #nationalregisterofhistoricplaces #hbcu #underrepresented

  • preservation50Awesome shot! We've entered you in the #p50photo contest! Good luck!
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