The principle of localized force: The central feature of jiu jitsu is to use mechanical advantage to control greater strength and aggression with less. How is this possible? It is done largely through the principle of localized force. Let's say we have an opponent who can apply an average of one hundred units of strength in standard strength tests while we can only generate 50 units of strength. As a whole, he is roughly twice as strong as us overall. How is victory through grappling possible in such a case? The key is to understand that it is possible to use a very high percentage of our overall strength to attack a small percentage of my opponents overall strength at a point of his body which, if attacked successfully, will end his ability to continue the fight. If I can use the various movements of jiu jitsu to maneuver into a position where I can create a temporary LOCAL strength advantage at a critical point of my opponents body (neck or joints), I can overcome an OVERALL strength disadvantage. The whole basis of our sport is precisely to develop the skill of maneuvering into these local advantages as efficiently as possible and using that to create a threat to a critical but vulnerable body part in a way that leads to submission.  A good example would be ashi garami, where a very high percentage of our overall strength - both legs, both hips, back and both arms are used to restrain an opponent's single leg and hip in a way that allows us to threaten severe damage. If a good ashi garami allows us to use 90% of our 50 units of strength against an opponent's single leg, 33% of his 100 units of strength, then we shall have a considerable local strength advantage on an opponent twice as strong as ourselves overall. This is one of the core principles of our sport and one which we must constantly keep in mind as we train and develop. Here, Gordon Ryan uses a high percentage of his total strength on the isolated leg of his opponent through a variation of ashi garami, creating a local advantage long enough to threaten a break and get a submission on his way to victory at EBI 8
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  • danaherjohnThe principle of localized force: The central feature of jiu jitsu is to use mechanical advantage to control greater strength and aggression with less. How is this possible? It is done largely through the principle of localized force. Let's say we have an opponent who can apply an average of one hundred units of strength in standard strength tests while we can only generate 50 units of strength. As a whole, he is roughly twice as strong as us overall. How is victory through grappling possible in such a case? The key is to understand that it is possible to use a very high percentage of our overall strength to attack a small percentage of my opponents overall strength at a point of his body which, if attacked successfully, will end his ability to continue the fight. If I can use the various movements of jiu jitsu to maneuver into a position where I can create a temporary LOCAL strength advantage at a critical point of my opponents body (neck or joints), I can overcome an OVERALL strength disadvantage. The whole basis of our sport is precisely to develop the skill of maneuvering into these local advantages as efficiently as possible and using that to create a threat to a critical but vulnerable body part in a way that leads to submission. A good example would be ashi garami, where a very high percentage of our overall strength - both legs, both hips, back and both arms are used to restrain an opponent's single leg and hip in a way that allows us to threaten severe damage. If a good ashi garami allows us to use 90% of our 50 units of strength against an opponent's single leg, 33% of his 100 units of strength, then we shall have a considerable local strength advantage on an opponent twice as strong as ourselves overall. This is one of the core principles of our sport and one which we must constantly keep in mind as we train and develop. Here, Gordon Ryan uses a high percentage of his total strength on the isolated leg of his opponent through a variation of ashi garami, creating a local advantage long enough to threaten a break and get a submission on his way to victory at EBI 8

  • dinthomasLove this
  • wildebeast82Reading Johns explanations is like stepping into the matrix. It all makes fucking sense.
  • erik_owingsBest teacher ever.
  • xguardProf. Danaher is very articulate with his descriptions.👍
  • raysel537Usually enjoy your posts, this one was insightful, but that's my coach getting heel hooked...no likes this time😶. Thank you for your continued sharing of knowledge
  • danaherjohn@raysel537 oops! Sorry dude 😉😜 Will post a different picture next time!
  • drasticgrafixNice page!
  • priee47Stopped reading after "The principle"
  • fyrsedSo people get footsie in jujitsh?
  • kevindavidjackman@ulloarichard
  • jtm167What was your profession before (or currently outside of) jiu jitsu? I'm curious given your direct and efficient use of words, especially within a subject matter so infinite as this. Lawyer?
  • fadeetz@danaherjohn This is a fantastic breakdown of how to approach energy allocation. Are there any specific resources you would recommend for aspiring instructors that provide this level of technical detail?
  • harrycloudfootExcellent explanation
  • the_wild_gentlemanThat's poetry @danaherjohn
  • lightsavorYour ability to break things down in simple terms like this is really a sign of genius. Respect!
  • simmersawVery appropriate explanation of the gentle art..
  • abronxtale42Everyday I check my feed for coach @danaherjohn and his breakdowns. He never fails to impressive. Amazing.
  • gem.australia👏👏👏
  • stevewebster23@danaherjohn interested on your thoughts on kani basami. I'm sure I've seen Gary use this throw, even though it's a known leg breaker.
  • yusufbob@danaherjohn from the smaller individuals point of view. Which submissions and entries do you think are best to utilise when facing an opponent who is significantly larger/stronger ?
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