As I sat with friends watching the debate last night, I felt anxiety about the future of our country. Watching two presidential hopefuls argue over tax reform, immigration and racial profiling amongst petty insults and interruptions was discouraging to say the least. On a more personal level, I woke up this morning to the published commentary of Vogue and Vogue.com editors essentially bullying "bloggers" and I thought, if women can't even support each other in a female-centric industry, then we really are screwed.

I've always felt the word "blogger" is reductive and non-descriptive of what I and many others like myself do. I am an entrepreneur, an influencer, a business woman...and yes, I have a blog too. It saddens me that a respected institution such as Vogue would insult bloggers and attempt to discourage young woman from forging their own career paths, by expressing themselves through what Vogue represents; personal style fashion.

I've always felt my "brand" to be slightly more commercial than high end, but that doesn't mean I don't aspire to work with Vogue one day. And on some level I get it; parading around for street style photographers outside a show may look silly to some, but this exchange between photographers, models, celebrities, editors and, yes, bloggers serves a necessary purpose in this industry. From a practical perspective, it provides content for websites like Vogue.com and from an artistic perspective provides a large platform for brands to display their most recent collections.

I’d like to give Vogue the benefit of the doubt here, and say that a few old-school editors representing an archaic mindset of the prestigious publication rattled off some thoughtless, bitter comments. Perhaps they’ll change their opinions after reading the responses of countless bloggers, followers, and readers alike who are firing back with their own opinions on who and what matters in our industry. I think it’s safe to say almost every designer, brand, and model in the fashion industry owes some of their success to the rise of social media and digital content. No one should be made to feel ashamed of that.

And yes, I am registered to vote.
14,475 likes
  • weworewhatAs I sat with friends watching the debate last night, I felt anxiety about the future of our country. Watching two presidential hopefuls argue over tax reform, immigration and racial profiling amongst petty insults and interruptions was discouraging to say the least. On a more personal level, I woke up this morning to the published commentary of Vogue and Vogue.com editors essentially bullying "bloggers" and I thought, if women can't even support each other in a female-centric industry, then we really are screwed.

    I've always felt the word "blogger" is reductive and non-descriptive of what I and many others like myself do. I am an entrepreneur, an influencer, a business woman...and yes, I have a blog too. It saddens me that a respected institution such as Vogue would insult bloggers and attempt to discourage young woman from forging their own career paths, by expressing themselves through what Vogue represents; personal style fashion.

    I've always felt my "brand" to be slightly more commercial than high end, but that doesn't mean I don't aspire to work with Vogue one day. And on some level I get it; parading around for street style photographers outside a show may look silly to some, but this exchange between photographers, models, celebrities, editors and, yes, bloggers serves a necessary purpose in this industry. From a practical perspective, it provides content for websites like Vogue.com and from an artistic perspective provides a large platform for brands to display their most recent collections.

    I’d like to give Vogue the benefit of the doubt here, and say that a few old-school editors representing an archaic mindset of the prestigious publication rattled off some thoughtless, bitter comments. Perhaps they’ll change their opinions after reading the responses of countless bloggers, followers, and readers alike who are firing back with their own opinions on who and what matters in our industry. I think it’s safe to say almost every designer, brand, and model in the fashion industry owes some of their success to the rise of social media and digital content. No one should be made to feel ashamed of that.

    And yes, I am registered to vote.

  • lawson.asiaSuch a classy response! Yet it's still tongue-in-cheek because you chose to respond on the very platform the editor disparaged. So proud of you Danielle!
  • kenzasmg🙌🏼✨
  • everettphotos#WORD
  • sassyredlipstick@twopeasinaprada did you see this?
  • twopeasinaprada@sassyredlipstick a-fucking-men! 🙌🏼
  • whereyourheartisnowThis is amazing!!! Love it! Thank you!
  • jaimeemoRespect 👍🏼❤️
  • gretchybowYou are such an inspiration. Never let them make you feel small
  • charmedbycamilleYESSSSS girl. Especially to the women part. We should all help each other! This was a smart, well thought out response that proved these women completely wrong. AMEN.
  • closetviceSo well said!!! I applaud you and your fellow bloggers for taking a stand on this and speaking up for the contributions that you all make in the industry! I for one so not look for models for inspiration. I look for girls like yourself - girls of all shapes and sizes and tastes - to get creative ideas! 💕
  • automaticreplynycPerfectly articulated. In a retreat in sri lanka for a month and so glad I am not there for the circus that has become out politics. Disheartening. But will give the Vogue article a read. xx
  • thelushlistEvery point is on point. Thank you!
  • beckermanblogWe got your back!!!🤘🏻🤘🏻🤘🏻🤘🏻❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️
  • bostongeorgina💛
  • kelly_mcg0vern🙌🙌🙌
  • aprilskies99🙌👏🙏
  • jvrneyswimwearbravo
  • hollybhurley@seededinthesouth 🙌🏼
  • annabel.rnWhat was the title of the Vogue Article ??? @weworewhat
  • crazechameleonstudioRight on!
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