Have you seen the exclusive 5 #STEM projects from @tinkerlab in our new April issue? We are so excited to work with #RachelleDoorley on these fabulous, fun learning projects! See full directions below for her Brushbot! This crazy critter moves on its own!
WHAT YOU’LL NEED • 4 AA batteries • 6-volt battery case with wire lead terminals and an on-off switch (we used the Philmore BH3411B AA Battery Holder, $1; amazon.com) • 6-volt hobby motor (like the Uxcell High Torque Cylinder Magnetic Electric Mini DC Motor, $6; amazon.com) • Electrical tape • Washer, dime, or other small, flat object • Kitchen brush • Duct tape • Felt • Scissors • Tacky glue
WHAT TO DO 1. Put batteries in the battery case. Connect the leads to the hobby motor (it doesn’t matter which color lead connects to which), and secure the wires in place with electrical tape. Attach the washer to the motor’s shaft with electrical tape. 2. Attach the battery pack and motor to the brush with duct tape, and decorate as desired (just make sure you can still access the on-off switch). (Find templates and instructions for our designs at familyfunmag .com/printables.) Turn it on to see it move on its bristle “feet.”
HOW DOES IT WORK? Your child has created a simple circuit, a closed path that an electrical current travels through. The battery provides the electricity, and the wires conduct it to the motor. When the motor’s shaft spins, the washer throws it off-balance, making the whole motor—and the brush along with it—vibrate and move.
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  • familyfunmagHave you seen the exclusive 5 #STEM projects from @tinkerlab in our new April issue? We are so excited to work with #RachelleDoorley on these fabulous, fun learning projects! See full directions below for her Brushbot! This crazy critter moves on its own!
    WHAT YOU’LL NEED • 4 AA batteries • 6-volt battery case with wire lead terminals and an on-off switch (we used the Philmore BH3411B AA Battery Holder, $1; amazon.com) • 6-volt hobby motor (like the Uxcell High Torque Cylinder Magnetic Electric Mini DC Motor, $6; amazon.com) • Electrical tape • Washer, dime, or other small, flat object • Kitchen brush • Duct tape • Felt • Scissors • Tacky glue
    WHAT TO DO 1. Put batteries in the battery case. Connect the leads to the hobby motor (it doesn’t matter which color lead connects to which), and secure the wires in place with electrical tape. Attach the washer to the motor’s shaft with electrical tape. 2. Attach the battery pack and motor to the brush with duct tape, and decorate as desired (just make sure you can still access the on-off switch). (Find templates and instructions for our designs at familyfunmag .com/printables.) Turn it on to see it move on its bristle “feet.”
    HOW DOES IT WORK? Your child has created a simple circuit, a closed path that an electrical current travels through. The battery provides the electricity, and the wires conduct it to the motor. When the motor’s shaft spins, the washer throws it off-balance, making the whole motor—and the brush along with it—vibrate and move.

  • mastermindautoshop@growfamilylove Let's do this with our children! #homeschool
  • patty_fam@larryh56 @amma_houser you should make these with the girls!! 💚
  • m_y_stephenson@joybroughtme
  • christadickersonI've got it all setup as described and my brush doesn't vibrate/move :(. Are there detailed pictures somewhere? Maybe it's how I have the dime attached or is the motor stick supposed to hit something?
  • galileocampsWe make these too, we love our little Bristlebots!
  • familyfunmag@christadickerson I'm going to try to get an editor on to troubleshoot with you...
  • familyfunmag@tinkerlab can you help with this reader's question??
  • tinkerlab@christadickerson @familyfunmag what kind of brush are you using? I had the same experience with a wood brush that was too heavy for the motor and just wouldn't move.
  • christadickerson@tinkerlab @familyfunmag it's a plastic brush from the dollar store - maybe the size of my hand? (So bigger than a nail brush but not the heavy duty ones at Lowes.) I'm wondering if it's something about the dime and motor? Thx for your help!
  • tinkerlab@christadickerson is the motor running?
  • christadickerson@tinkerlab yes for sure. I tried with a 6volt as described from Amazon and then a 3volt from lowes. Both are spinning.
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